Monthly Archives: August 2014

PBS Tease

Recently, PBS paid us a visit for an upcoming segment to be airing as apart of a PBS Quest episode.  The air date is still TBD, but in the mean time here’s a link to a quick preview from the journalist and videographer, Michael Werner.

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Filed under Kaeli in the media

Identifying crow dieases: Avian pox

Recently, I received an email from someone in distress over an obviously sick crow in their yard. They sent some photos and were wondering about the cause of the crusty areas around the bill and eyes. Although I am by no means an expert in avian diseases, there’s one that’s easy to identify and by far the most common I see in the field so I feel it’s appropriate to provide a brief description of it here.

Bird with a likely avian pox infection as identified by the whitish/pink lesions around the exposed skin.  Photo c/o D. Wright

Bird with a likely avian pox infection as identified by the whitish/pink lesions around the exposed skin. Photo c/o D. Wright

Avian pox is a common disease affecting birds across many different orders including songbirds, raptors and game birds. It’s caused by the avipoxvirus of which there are at least 3 different strains. There’s multiple modes of transmission but it’s most often spread by mosquitoes which is why it’s observed more commonly in the spring and summer months. It can also be spread via direct transmission or indirectly through inhalation of dander, feather debris or sharing contaminated food or water sources (a good reminder to regularly clean feeders and bird baths).

There are two types of avian pox: wet and dry. Wet pox affects the mouth, throat, trachea and lungs and is most likely to be fatal because it can eventually cause suffocation. Dry pox infections are easy to identify because they result in visible lesions and scarring on the non feathered areas of the bird. In the early stages small yellow, white or pink blisters form which become large raised areas that eventually burst. This results in the formation of crusty scabs that, on crows, will appear brown or black. As long as the the bird’s ability to feed isn’t influenced by the location of the scabbing the lesions will generally heal in 2-4 weeks. The general health of the bird before the infection, and the presence of any secondary infections that result from the open lesions will influence the bird’s likelihood of survival.

The pox covered feet of a crow fatally weakened by this disease.

The pox covered feet of a crow fatally weakened by this disease. c/o Sarah Ramirez

If you notice pox infected birds at your feeder(s) the best way to protect your visitors is to stop feeding them. This may seem cruel or counterproductive since sick birds need access to consist food sources to fight the infection, but providing food bonanzas concentrate birds and increases the risk of transmission to healthy individuals. Depending on your situation you may be able to provide food to the individual without worry of creating contact between multiple birds.

Please leave a message in the comments if you have high quality photos of your infected birds and would be willing to let me use them in this post.  Thank you!

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Filed under Crow disease, Crow life history

Notes from the field: That golden moment

I am a huge fan of podcastes of all kinds. Especially when I’m working a pair of very “avoidy” birds and I’m basically in for several hours of watching an unchanging pile of food on the ground, an earbud with a good story is the key to maintaining my focus on the sidewalk, rooftops and trees for any incoming birds. One of my favorite podcasts is The Story Collider which describes itself as “stories about how science touches people’s lives”. I highly recommend it for both science geeks and non-scientists alike, but I imagine it resonates deeper with those who feel engaged with science on a more regular basis. A common theme of these stories is “the golden moment”, and whatever that may mean for the storyteller. Which got me thinking: What’s my golden moment?

Conducting research in an urban environment, especially a study as conspicuous as mine, has it’s benefits and drawbacks. Drawbacks include: Confrontation over the study itself, people or pets unknowingly interfering with experiments, sometimes unpleasant or slightly risky work environments, etc. But the advantage is easily summarized: I get to engage with all kinds of people about my research. I derive and immense amount of joy from explaining my study to folks, especially in the company of children. There’s one particular moment in the course of the experiment, however, that stands out from the rest.

At a certain point in the study I have the masked person walking around instead of remaining stationary. Today I found myself conducting just such a trial and, frankly, these tests can be rather awkward. I can hear people whispering about the masked person, what they might be doing (often they don’t notice their “UW CROW RESEARCH” sign) and rarely are they emboldened enough to ask and, frankly, it’s probably for the best because I need my full attention on my birds during these tests (I’m working the camera while my volunteer walks around). As you can imagine, it can be a bit uncomfortable to cause such a stir and then just keep walking leaving people to scratch their heads (or think worse) about what they just saw. But occasionally the golden moment happens. That moment when they’ve noticed the mask, perhaps even read the sign and are eagerly discussing what a bizarre scene they’ve just witnessed with their companions when, boom, in comes the crow. Suddenly, without my needing to explain it, every onlooker can see precisely what’s happening: A crow knows that person and they don’t like them. An explosion of scolding, body language and flight patterns makes the target of their animosity well known. During these moments without any effort or intention, people are experiencing science. They’re watching crows and potentially learning something new about them. They will not know the full back-story to what’s going on of course, but there’s enough information laid right out there for them that conversations about crows and their intelligence and antics are inevitable. Suddenly the bird so many people ignore becomes the object of fascination and attention. These are the moments that I believe create changes in attitudes about crows and, more broadly, what science research looks like. These are my golden moments.

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Filed under Being a scientist, Graduate Research