Tag Archives: adult crows begging

Crow curiosities: who is begging in April?

Right now, in early spring, you may have noticed a crow or two fluttering their wings and making the classic “waaah, waaahhh” sound that roughly translates to “feed me, feed me”!  Although it’s tempting to think these are young crows, it’s far too early in the breeding season for fledglings to be on the loose.  So who are these juvie doppelgangers? Adult female crows.

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Begging juveniles like this one won’t be roaming around the PNW until mid June and later.

During the nest building stage you may hear females making these sounds just while on the ground foraging with their mate or while perched near the nest like this female was.  Why do they do it?  It’s essentially a way to prime the pump and remind their mate that they’re going to need to be fed once they’re saddled to the nest and can’t forage as much for themselves.  Once they are actively incubating, they’ll continue to beg only now it’s really a demand for the food they need and can’t get for themselves without risking their eggs getting too cool.  Although males will take a turn on the nest, they do not have a formal brood patch and can’t do much more than temporarily keep the eggs insulated.

Although it’s tempting, hopefully now you won’t be fooled by this April trick!

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A male returns to the nest with a bill-load of peanuts for his hungry mate.

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Filed under Crow behavior, Crow curiosities